California Prenups Can Cement Your Relationship

Top Orange County divorce lawyers; The Maggio Law Firm

The latest soap opera features a couple contemplating signing a prenuptial agreement. He feels it’s not very romantic.

It’s true; there’s a great deal of debate over the necessity of having a prenuptial agreement in place prior to getting married. If there were ever any questions about whether or not it was really the right thing to do, one could ask Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt for their experiences with a prenuptial, which isn’t to say that prenuptials are only for wealthy people, because that isn’t the case.

“One of the most prevalent myths about prenuptials is that they ‘are’ only for the wealthy and that those who don’t have much don’t need an agreement. While you might not have that much money to go around, having an open and honest talk about how each of you handles finances before you’re married will make sure there are no surprises later,” explained Gerald A. Maggio, an Orange County divorce attorney.

Also, who knows what the fates will deal out? One of the spouses may acquire more money in the future through a business venture or an artistic talent. Knowing how to handle the business division now, in advance of any possible divorce is a good move.

Many people also think that prenuptials are only designed to protect the spouse that has the most money and take it away from the one who doesn’t have much. “The truth of the matter is that prenuptial agreements are supposed to be created to protect ‘both’ spouses. It should go without saying that any prenuptial that is one-sided will not likely be enforceable in court,” Maggio indicated. The whole idea behind these agreements is that they are fair. In order for a prenuptial agreement to be enforceable, signing it must be voluntary and thus, the agreement can’t be unfair when it is signed.

As for the romance of the situation, it’s better to discuss touchy things like money before marriage rather than find out later that neither party likes how the other one spends and handles money. While this may not be a great deal of fun, working toward a common goal often cements a relationship into a viable working partnership; a partnership where both are clear about their financial goals.

For some reason, people seem to think that they must deal with every possible issue that might come up in a divorce later. “This isn’t the case. In fact, prenuptials may be as complex or as simple as the parties wish. They are private contracts and therefore they can have just about anything in them. As an example, if one party only wants to protect just their pre-marital property that may be written into the contract,” commented Maggio.

The toughest thing for couples to understand seems to be the myth that if they just live together, the live-in doesn’t have any claim on the other’s property or income. Think again, the one with the income and assets could be risking them by living together without being married. “No doubt the word ‘palimony’ comes to mind and while difficult to prove, it has been done and people still try this route to claim support after a breakup,” Maggio said. The bottom line here is if people choose to live together without getting married, it’s a smart idea to have a cohabitation agreement.

Gerald A. Maggio is senior partner of The Maggio Law Firm, Inc., an Orange County and Riverside Divorce and Family Law firm headquartered in Irvine, California.  The Maggio Law Firm is experienced in all aspects of divorce and family law matters, including child custody, child support, spousal support, complicated high asset marital property cases, and domestic partnerships.

For more information or to schedule a consultation with Orange County divorce lawyer Gerald Maggio, contact The Maggio Law Firm by calling (949) 553-0304 or visiting http://www.maggiolawfirm.com/.

 
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