Divorce Mediation Helps to Create Fairer, More Amicable Dissolutions

A new book The Longevity Project sheds light on many interesting aspects of how to live a long life and those people who end up the healthiest and happiest. Amongst many other topics, it discusses marriage and divorce. Staying married just for the children is not a good idea when the home environment is clearly troubled, they noted.

A home environment where parents are always in arguments, hiding things from each other, and taking sides with the children can have worse effects on a child’s long-term health than if they were to get divorced. A divorce blogger, Mandy Walker, wrote that, “…the Longevity Study reinforces the importance of putting the best interests of your children first when divorcing. There are some that will argue putting their needs first means not divorcing, period. But the reality is that life is more complicated than that, and divorces happen and will continue to happen.”

Divorce mediation can create a more stable way to break up the marriage and create a tailored solution that benefits the kids and the couple. Within a handful of sessions, the adults can discuss what their interests are for the division of assets, any property, and the parenting agreement. This is in stark contrast to a litigated divorce where a judge will decide everything and the process can take up to a year with a lot more costs.

As the blogger said, “…we can make significant improvements to how children weather the divorce of their parents by normalizing divorce.” Mediation allows the dissolution to happen in an amicable way. With each spouse’s input they will be able to more actively have a hand in the parenting agreement and learn more about the collaborative parenting process.

The divorce mediator is a neutral party, so he or she will facilitate the discussion and move it forward when there is a roadblock. The process shows each parent how they can take part in their child’s education and health care decisions, amongst other things. Mediation helps each parent find a way to be civil and cooperative, which can have great effects on how they carry themselves post-divorce.

Mandy Walker notes that, “…people who can face the end of their marriage as a learning opportunity can have the resilience and capacity to reinvent themselves.” Mediation can help a couple consider issues they might have never thought about, increase awareness of what is a fair settlement, and help them start a better chapter of their lives.

Renee Cary writes for Orange County divorce mediation lawyer, Gerald Maggio of The Maggio Law Firm. To learn more about Orange County divorce mediation attorney, Gerald Maggio visit Maggiolawfirm.com.