3 Ways Small Business Owners Can Protect Business Assets In Divorce

Posted by: Gerald A. Maggio, Esq.

Orange County divorce lawyers; The Maggio Law FirmDivorce is a stressful experience, especially when it involves the division of properties, assets and businesses. For some, it is even more painful because a business is about all they have and splitting the business in two can cause a lot of financial damage. Small business owners know how tough it is to operate a business when the economy is constantly changing. Include a divorce and the stress reaches to new levels. So, what should a business owner do at times like these? They can follow three easy steps to limit the impact to their business from divorce.

  1. Maintain an amicable relationship with your ex

Nothing like a good talk between spouses when it comes to splitting businesses and assets. That’s the first thing you should do when faced with a similar situation. If your spouse is a business partner with you, it becomes even more crucial why an amicable relationship is necessary. Focus more on the business part and less on personal matters. An honest talk with your spouse can have great benefits for your business.

  1. Make prenuptial and postnuptial agreements

A prenuptial agreement is not the best gift your future spouse might be expecting from your side but it is more of a gift for your own self. It’s always better to stay optimistic about marriage. Signing a prenuptial agreement will give you the upper hand in business ownership. California is a state that has community property laws which mean that every property bought after marriage is likely to be split equally between both partners. In such cases, a postnuptial agreement comes in handy. It helps determine what part of the business each of you should own after it gets divided.

  1. Form a corporation or a trust

One of the best ways to protect the company and business assets is by forming a corporation or a trust. It’s best to incorporate the trust before you get married. It gives you sole ownership over your business and during divorce proceedings it becomes easy for you to defend it against a division.

If you form your company as a corporation or an LLC, you create a legal entity that is separately owned by you. However, if you use marital assets to pay for company expenses, it may be used to claim the company as a marital property.

By following these 3 steps, you will be able to avoid or at least minimize the damage a divorce can bring to your small business.

Getting divorced in California can be complicated.  Download our free eBook, 18 Important Things to Know About California Divorce to educate yourself on the process.  

 
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